Coalmining Representation in the Heritage Sector of the East Midlands

Coalmining Representation in the Heritage Sector of the East Midlands

NUM National Strike – 40th anniversary

On the 9th January 1972 the NUM started its first national strike following a ten-week overtime ban.  The strike lasted 7 weeks and ended with Lord Wilberforce intervening (the Wilberforce Inquiry) following national power cuts and blackouts.   The miners were treated as a special case and they were awarded a pay increase in excess of limits set by the Heath Government.  The strike was the longest dispute since 1926.  East Midlands miners support for the strike was instrumental in the eventual victory for the NUM. They picketed the Trent Valley Power Stations.   The miners returned to work on 28th February 1972 and the power cuts ended on 2nd March after 20 days of blackouts.

Important dates in the 1972 Strike

9th January –  Beginning of the 7 week strike following at ten-week overtime ban.

8th / 9th February – Saltley Coke Depot Picketing (Flying Pickets).

9th February –  State of Emergency is declared by Ted Heath’s Conservative Government.

16th February – Electricity Blackouts throughout Britain.  Twelve Power Stations shut down to save coal supplies and industry put on a 3 day week.

18th February – Lord Wilberforce Enquiry into Miners’ wages as a special case.

25th February – NUM National Executive Committee  accept pay settlement by 27 to 1 vote.

28th February – NUM  members go back to work.  The 1972 strike was the biggest dispute since the 1926 Miners’ Lockout.

2nd March – Power cuts finally end after 20 days due to the effects of the Miners’ Strike.

 

Comments

  •  

    David February 16th, 2012 at 9:16 pm

    16th February 1972 saw total electricity blackouts in Britain. Twelve Power Stations were shut down to save fuel. Industry went onto a Three-Day week.

  •  

    David March 15th, 2012 at 10:52 pm

    I was awarded a bursary at the University of Nottingham to firstly look at how coalmining was represented in the museums and heritage centres of the East Midlands. I toured the region during the summer of 2010 to the spring of 2011 recording all sorts of aspects of the coalmining industry in the East Midlands at various locations. The second part of my remit was to introduce aspects of Digital and Social Media to this representation. To that end I have a Facebook page, a Twitter account, You Tube Account and a few things on Flickr. These can all be accessed from the MuBu website. I have also successfully completed a PhD recently, the title of my research thesis being “The Nottinghamshire Miners, the UDM and the 1984-85 Miners’ Strike: Scabs or Scapegoats?. Essentially it is a revisionist history on the role of the Nottinghamshire miners in that strike.

 

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About this Sponsor

The MuBu Coalmining Project took place from April 2010 to the end of March 2012.  The remit was two-fold - firstly to see how the once vast coalmining industry in the East Midlands was represented in the Heritage sector and secondly to bring aspects of social media to that representation. The Coal mining project was funded by Renaissance East Midlands (REM) and the Centre for Advanced Studies (CAS) at the University of Nottingham. The Bursary holder was Dr. David Amos who completed a PhD on the 1984-85 Miners Strike in the Nottinghamshire Coalfield. David is an ex miner, having worked in the deep mining coal industry at Annesley Colliery for 24 years.

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