Coalmining Representation in the Heritage Sector of the East Midlands

Coalmining Representation in the Heritage Sector of the East Midlands

A Leisurely walk and a Local History lesson at the same time!

Being a dog owner (we own a Parsons Russell Terrier) I do lots of walking.  The health virtues of walking are often mentioned in the media but there is another aspect to it.  With a little background research, a keen set of eyes and some imagination every walk becomes a history lesson.  This morning a short hours walk included the site of several old pits that operated around Eastwood in the 1800′s,  the former home of one half of the Eastwood coalowners (the Walker Family), the coach-drive that connected the home of the Walkers to the home of the other half of the Eastwood coalowners (the Barbers), a former industrial railway that connected the Barber-Walker pits, former pit houses and within shouting distance of the birthplace of a worldwide renown author (D H Lawrence).

Hoskins (the founder of Local History) once said that the best way to study Local History is to put a pair of boots on, get some old maps and walk about?  A favourite saying of my Dad’s about the men at the pit was – “Some men at this pit travel the world and see nothing, a few others walk across a field and see everything”!

 

Comments

  •  

    David Amos August 3rd, 2011 at 6:56 pm

    This evening dog walking covered a section of the Erewash Valley near Eastwood following a Dad’s Taxi run! We walked a section of the remains of the Nottingham Canal (the Top Cut), then via the site of the former Newmanley’s Mill on the River Erewash, a former corn mill near Shipley Boat. After this we walked up a section of the Erewash Canal (Bottom Cut) and had a chin-wag with a couple from Harlow on a narrow boat who were en-route to Langley Mill basin. Between the sites of the Erewash and Nottingham Canals, near Eastwood Lock, was the site of the former Eastwood Colliery – closed in the 1870′s. Also near here is the remains of a branch line from the Midland Railway to Eastwood Colliery and the embankment of an old gangline. Near the site of the Shipley Boat Inn we walked by the site of the former Shipley Boat Wharf which was a major coal wharf in the 19th century. The circular tour was completed by another short walk along the Top Cut. Another industrial heritage walk completed on a lovely evening!

  •  

    harry Riley September 15th, 2014 at 3:40 pm

    A great insight into bygone Eastwood by one of our top local historians. What he doesn’t know about our mining history is not worth knowing!

 

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About this Sponsor

The MuBu Coalmining Project took place from April 2010 to the end of March 2012.  The remit was two-fold - firstly to see how the once vast coalmining industry in the East Midlands was represented in the Heritage sector and secondly to bring aspects of social media to that representation. The Coal mining project was funded by Renaissance East Midlands (REM) and the Centre for Advanced Studies (CAS) at the University of Nottingham. The Bursary holder was Dr. David Amos who completed a PhD on the 1984-85 Miners Strike in the Nottinghamshire Coalfield. David is an ex miner, having worked in the deep mining coal industry at Annesley Colliery for 24 years.

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