Coalmining Representation in the Heritage Sector of the East Midlands

Coalmining Representation in the Heritage Sector of the East Midlands

Disappearing World – The Independent – 2005

The Independent Newspaper published a supplement on 17th October 2005 called Disappearing World.  The booklet was based on 100 things your grandchildren may never see.  Entry 39 on page 36 was Working Coalmines.  The text read as follows;

In the last 20 years the virtual disappearance of coalmining has changed the nature of large areas of Britain and communities that were established there.  Some maintain that given the conditions in which miners worked, this has been no great loss.  But mining was more than an industry, it was a way of life that spawned an entire culture.  Just 8 pits remain in Britain out of 170 that operated before the disastrous miners strike of 1984, and nearly 100,000 former miners have been forced to seek new jobs.  A few mines have been turned into museums, but others have been flooded and put beyond use.   Although there is uncertainty about how Britain’s future energy needs will be supplied, it is unlikely that coal will play a significant role.

 

Comments

  •  

    David Amos March 9th, 2011 at 8:52 pm

    Since the Independent booklet came out in 2005 the number of operating collieries in Britain has dropped to just 5 by 2011. Just one colliery, Thoresby, in Notts, remains in the East Midlands.

    At the present time one out of the 5 remaining collieries, Hatfield Colliery near Stainforth in Yorkshire, is in administration.

 

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About this Sponsor

The MuBu Coalmining Project took place from April 2010 to the end of March 2012.  The remit was two-fold - firstly to see how the once vast coalmining industry in the East Midlands was represented in the Heritage sector and secondly to bring aspects of social media to that representation. The Coal mining project was funded by Renaissance East Midlands (REM) and the Centre for Advanced Studies (CAS) at the University of Nottingham. The Bursary holder was Dr. David Amos who completed a PhD on the 1984-85 Miners Strike in the Nottinghamshire Coalfield. David is an ex miner, having worked in the deep mining coal industry at Annesley Colliery for 24 years.

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