Victorian Farmlife

Victorian Farmlife

Children should be seen and not heard!

In a large nursery, there would be a Nanny in overall charge with a number of more junior nursemaids. Nanny would provide a basic education and instruction in “useful” work such as sewing for the girls. At the age of about ten, some boys would go off to boarding school, whereas girls would often stay at home and be taught by a governess. By the end of Victoria’s reign, girls’ schools had become more widely accepted and so the position of governess began to die out. The nursery itself was usually situated at the top of a large house, with the children’s bedrooms next door (sometimes referred to as the day and the night nurseries). By the end of the 19th century, these were often decorated with especially designed wallpaper, carpets and child size tables and chairs.

 

Comments

  •  

    Vicky August 11th, 2010 at 12:46 pm

    This is really interesting, thank you

 

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The Village, Church Farm and the project Victorian Farm Life documents a wealth of information exploring rural Lincolnshire.

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